Meshuggah @ House Of Blues
Luca Zadra
CampusTales Contributor
Berklee College of Music
May 18th, 2017


Meshuggah may not be a band that many of you have heard of and it’s most likely a band that the majority of people would not listen to. However, it’s a band that I feel is a privilege to see live, especially as a musician.

Extreme metal is a tough genre to swallow and it requires being understood before being appreciated and, within Meshuggah, there are some very specific musical elements to look for and focus on for everything else to make sense. When I first came across them, I believe I was about 13, I heard the track “Bleed” off the album “Obzen”, definitely their biggest “hit” (relatively speaking). At the time the track made no sense to me, I asked myself what could possibly be appealing about a heavy distorted guitar playing pretty much the same note for big part of the song. I was okay with the lack of melodic content but if a song hasn’t much of a melody then it should groove and I couldn’t hear it until a few years later when I found Meshuggah’s secret weapon: deceptive rhythmic patterns. The band writes complex rhythms meant to throw the audience off its game but everything falls into place when you start paying attention to the hi-hat. I realised that over that crazy fast rhythmic pattern heavily emphasised by Tomas’ amazing foot technique there is a very simple pattern happening with the hi-hat and the snare drum and all of a sudden: BAM! It makes sense and it grooves, now!
Within Meshuggah, there are some very specific musical elements to look for and focus on for everything else to make sense
Ever since I found the secret (not so secret) element my love for the band grew exponentially and peaked when I got to see them for my first time at Graspop 2014, a metal festival in Dessel, Belgium. Since then I feel the compulsive need to go see them again every time they come near me and I finally got the opportunity last Wednesday, November 2nd.

The show was incredible as usual, every time they play I get catapulted into some sort of trance state where all I can do is contemplate the musicianship, technical ability and “tightness” of a band that sounds like no other and plays like no other. By not using real amps and plugging straight into the venue’s PA system Meshuggah actually sounds good and clear live which, believe me, is a truly rare thing among metal bands., especially when you’re at the front. The power of their performances, other than musical ability, comes from their light show: it is perfectly synced to the music they’re playing. That means that all the crazy rhythm patterns that they so well play are emphasised by the same pattern being visually delivered to you and envelopes your senses making the experience surreal. I am frankly speechless, words can never express what it’s like to see this band live and I hope that if any of you are able to appreciate them, please go support the band at one of their shows because you will be blown away!

Click below to get a little snippet of how badass they are live. When you’re there it’s a whole other story! By the way, if you cannot enjoy their music you may enjoy their lyrics.



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Berklee College of Music
Berklee College of Music
Berklee College of Music
Berklee College of Music
Berklee College of Music
Meshuggah @ House Of Blues
Luca Zadra
CampusTales Contributor
Berklee College of Music
May 15th, 2017
Meshuggah may not be a band that many of you have heard of and it’s most likely a band that the majority of people would not listen to. However, it’s a band that I feel is a privilege to see live, especially as a musician.

Extreme metal is a tough genre to swallow and it requires being understood before being appreciated and, within Meshuggah, there are some very specific musical elements to look for and focus on for everything else to make sense. When I first came across them, I believe I was about 13, I heard the track “Bleed” off the album “Obzen”, definitely their biggest “hit” (relatively speaking). At the time the track made no sense to me, I asked myself what could possibly be appealing about a heavy distorted guitar playing pretty much the same note for big part of the song. I was okay with the lack of melodic content but if a song hasn’t much of a melody then it should groove and I couldn’t hear it until a few years later when I found Meshuggah’s secret weapon: deceptive rhythmic patterns. The band writes complex rhythms meant to throw the audience off its game but everything falls into place when you start paying attention to the hi-hat. I realised that over that crazy fast rhythmic pattern heavily emphasised by Tomas’ amazing foot technique there is a very simple pattern happening with the hi-hat and the snare drum and all of a sudden: BAM! It makes sense and it grooves, now!
Within Meshuggah, there are some very specific musical elements to look for and focus on for everything else to make sense
Ever since I found the secret (not so secret) element my love for the band grew exponentially and peaked when I got to see them for my first time at Graspop 2014, a metal festival in Dessel, Belgium. Since then I feel the compulsive need to go see them again every time they come near me and I finally got the opportunity last Wednesday, November 2nd.

The show was incredible as usual, every time they play I get catapulted into some sort of trance state where all I can do is contemplate the musicianship, technical ability and “tightness” of a band that sounds like no other and plays like no other. By not using real amps and plugging straight into the venue’s PA system Meshuggah actually sounds good and clear live which, believe me, is a truly rare thing among metal bands., especially when you’re at the front. The power of their performances, other than musical ability, comes from their light show: it is perfectly synced to the music they’re playing. That means that all the crazy rhythm patterns that they so well play are emphasised by the same pattern being visually delivered to you and envelopes your senses making the experience surreal. I am frankly speechless, words can never express what it’s like to see this band live and I hope that if any of you are able to appreciate them, please go support the band at one of their shows because you will be blown away!

Click below to get a little snippet of how badass they are live. When you’re there it’s a whole other story! By the way, if you cannot enjoy their music you may enjoy their lyrics.



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